OZARK ETCHER

CREATIVE WRITING AND MAKING
SUMMER 2019
A two part exercise in engaging with new perspectives.

This playful world building exercise consists of a short video, a speculative artifact, and an alternative worldview story.

CONTEXT:

_  Summer Institute in the Arts and Humanities

_  One week long

OZARK ETCHER

A two part exercise in engaging with new perspectives.

Designers often have to design for people and situations they don't understand or can't relate to. These short exercises allowed me to be playful and imaginative, while simultaneously practicing how to interpret and relate to an unfamiliar perspective.

To continue reading please revisit on a desktop browser.

SELF AND WORLD ANALYSIS

PART ONE: INTERVIEW AN OBJECT

This exercise was inspired by the podcast Everything is Alive, produced by Ian Chillag. We were asked to interview an object as a practice in world building during the Summer Institute in the Arts and Humanities. Acting as a record showcased how situating myself in an uncommon perspective can highlight behaviors and human constructs otherwise unconsidered.

*** My cats volunteered as stage designers.

I began by examining my own life-world. I considered my personal journey as a designer and a maker. A common aspect I found was collaboration.

I chose to explore collaboration with nonhumans because I have a passion for those that go unnoticed. With emerging technologies changing the way we navigate the world, it is increasingly important to consider those who may get excluded and forgotten.

PROBLEMATIC

Nonhuman beings may not be readily noticeable, but their contributions to each other and our world are vast. They may be unseen, unheard, or unmoving to the human eye, but they are creating and sustaining symbiotic relationships within a plurality of species. And yet, we don’t often acknowledge these nonhumans when we think about collaborative problem solving, design and resilience within the world.

To continue reading please revisit on a desktop browser.

Nonhuman beings may not be readily noticeable, but their contributions to each other and our world are vast. They may be unseen, unheard, or unmoving to the human eye, but they are creating and sustaining symbiotic relationships within a plurality of species. And yet, we don’t often acknowledge these nonhumans when we think about collaborative problem solving, design and resilience within the world.

WHAT IF THERE WAS ONLY ONE RECORD EVER MADE? HOW WOULD SOCIETY BE TRANSFORMED?

SELF AND WORLD ANALYSIS

PART TWO: BUILD A WORLD FROM THE OBJECT

Building from the interview exercise, I asked "What if there was only one record ever made? How would society be transformed?" I imagined our world with an alternate history.

In this divergent past, society structured itself in reflection of the record player. The people's daily schedule, thought processes, and framing of time revolved around the turning of the record and the transition of each song. When the record stopped spinning, the beings of the world struggled to collaborate in their problem solving. They had experienced life in individual, circular patterns. Their grooves did not overlap. Until they created Ozark Etcher...

PROBLEMATIC

Nonhuman beings may not be readily noticeable, but their contributions to each other and our world are vast. They may be unseen, unheard, or unmoving to the human eye, but they are creating and sustaining symbiotic relationships within a plurality of species. And yet, we don’t often acknowledge these nonhumans when we think about collaborative problem solving, design and resilience within the world.

KEY TAKEAWAYS

SELF AND WORLD ANALYSIS

ONGOING THOUGHTS

Designers often have to design for people and situations they don't understand or can't relate to. These short exercises allowed me to be playful and imaginative, while simultaneously practicing how to interpret and relate to an unfamiliar perspective.

I began by examining my own life-world. I considered my personal journey as a designer and a maker. A common aspect I found was collaboration.

I chose to explore collaboration with nonhumans because I have a passion for those that go unnoticed. With emerging technologies changing the way we navigate the world, it is increasingly important to consider those who may get excluded and forgotten.

PROBLEMATIC

Nonhuman beings may not be readily noticeable, but their contributions to each other and our world are vast. They may be unseen, unheard, or unmoving to the human eye, but they are creating and sustaining symbiotic relationships within a plurality of species. And yet, we don’t often acknowledge these nonhumans when we think about collaborative problem solving, design and resilience within the world.

To continue reading please revisit on a desktop browser.

Nonhuman beings may not be readily noticeable, but their contributions to each other and our world are vast. They may be unseen, unheard, or unmoving to the human eye, but they are creating and sustaining symbiotic relationships within a plurality of species. And yet, we don’t often acknowledge these nonhumans when we think about collaborative problem solving, design and resilience within the world.